Cabana – now open in Wembley!

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We visited the new bright and colourful Cabana in Wembley’s London Designer Outlet for their menu preview. During this we gave their menu a pretty good workout and I have to say it was hard to fault. We kicked proceedings off with aged parmesan dipped in honey (£2.95). Weird though this combination sounds, the nutty saltiness of the cheese worked really well with the sweetness of the honey. Also, we munched on pulled pork sliders (£5.45), wonderful spicy pulled pork complemented by the strong, nutty flavours from the Parmesan in the pao de queijo, and toasted corn kernels (£1.95) (a Brazilian version of popcorn) whilst we made our menu choices.

Parmesan Cheese cubes with honey

Parmesan Cheese cubes with honey

Pulled Pork Sliders

Pulled Pork Sliders

Toasted corn kernels

Toasted corn kernels

Moving onto starters, I had the spicy malagueta prawns (£5.95), marinated in Cabana’s signature sauce. They were so good but boy do they pack a punch! One of our waitresses told me that she can’t stop eating them but she ends up crying into a napkin because of the heat. My spice tolerance levels are pretty wussy but I think these prawns are worth shedding a few tears over! My mum got the salmon ceviche (£4.75), raw salmon marinated in chili and lime, which was pretty as a picture and had a lovely delicate flavour. Jason had the chicken coxinhas (£4.95) – velvety, mildly spiced centre of shredded chicken surrounded by a golden, crunchy breadcrumbed exterior. He said that these brought back wonderful holiday memories of travelling in Brazil.

Spicy Malagueta Prawns

Spicy Malagueta Prawns

Chicken Coxinhas

Chicken Coxinhas

Salmon ceviche

Salmon ceviche

For mains, I had the rack of ribs (£16.50) and sweet potato fries (£3.95). My ribs were delicious, tender, charred, fall-of-the-bone meat and a smokey sweet sauce. I loved the crispy coating on my sweet potato fries; my one small niggle was that some of them tasted a bit undercooked. Dad & Jason tucked into their rib-eye steaks (£14.95) which they said were cooked to perfection, melted in their mouth with just the right amount of marbling for a fantastic flavour experience, had a punchy chilli glaze, and were completed with a fresh salsa and a moreish farofa. Mum had a pork tenderloin (£6.95) marinated in a vibrant green chimichurri with a crisp parmesan cheese crust accompanied by black beans (£2.95); with the parsley, garlic and chilli in the chimichurri complementing the sweetness of the pork.

Rack of ribs with coleslaw

Rack of ribs with coleslaw

Pork Tenderloin with sides of Sweet Potato Fries and Black Beans

Pork Tenderloin with sides of Sweet Potato Fries and Black Beans

Rib-eye steak with sides of fresh salsa and farofa

Rib-eye steak with sides of fresh salsa and farofa

My dessert was the Cabana cheesecake (£4.95), a moreish combination of banana and dulce du leche (caramel), topped with caramelised almonds. This was perfect, the almonds adding an extra layer of crunch and sweetness. Jason and mum had a Nega Maluca (£4.25) – a deeply satisfying Brazilian flourless chocolate cake with a dark cocoa centre and a light chocolaty crust served with vanilla icecream topped with caramel sauce (doce de leite) and Brazilian peanut candy (pacoquinha); the way to end the meal in their opinion for any chocaholic. Dad had a Romeo & Juliet (£4.95), a guava diary icecream which he said was light and fruity but did not meet his expectations from his memories of the Brazilian classic of guava jelly and cheese.

The difficult decision of Cabana Cheesecake or Nega Maluca - what the heck, lets order both!

The difficult decision of Cabana Cheesecake or Nega Maluca – what the heck, let’s try both; the advantages of a separate dessert stomach!

Nega Maluca - plus vanilla icecream with doce de leite and pacoquinha

Nega Maluca – plus vanilla icecream with doce de leite and pacoquinha

Cabana Cheesecake

Cabana Cheesecake

Romeo & Juliet

Romeo & Juliet

Special shout out to super lovely waitress Rae, who was always willing to go the extra mile, and even brought me a cup of hot water so I could make myself a hot lime and honey drink for my sore throat! She also told us about Cabana’s admirable social policy of helping employing women who live in the favelas (slums) to make the denim covering for the seating in all the Cabanas. I love companies with a social conscience and if anything was the cherry on the cake to our fabulous meal at Cabana this was it. I have eaten at Cabana many times but have always been too keen to get to the food to read what it says on the placemats. Thank you Rae for the heads up!

Jas Samsung Galaxy S3 Oct photos from 2013 024

Denim Banquettes!

Denim Banquettes!

Overall, fab food in a wonderful Brazilian churrascaria experience and attentive, friendly service especially from Rae, Regina and Domenico – all overseen by the pleasant team of managers Guido, Marcella, Martha and Regina. We will be back to Cabana again very soon, particularly as they help us get through the colder winter months!

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Twitter: @cabana_brasil, #wembley

http://www.cabana-brasil.com

Wembley

Cabana Wembley

Located in London’s only designer outlet and sandwiched between Wembley Stadium and Wembley Arena, our fourth Cabana is the perfect pit stop if you’re enjoying this vast array of entertainment. Look out for the authentic cabana “hut” bar serving cocktails and extra cold beer!

67a London Designer Outlet
Wembley City
London
HA9 0FD
E: wembley@cabana-brasil.com O:12.00pm – 11.30pm, Mon – Sat
12.00pm – 10pm, Sun
 
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About goantolondon

International food and travel blog by London based British Goan duo: Jason and Chiara Pinto. Twitter: @goantolondon @jasonpinto100 @chiarapinto About Goa: Goa is a small state on the western coast of India. Though the smallest Indian state, Goa has played an influential role in Indian history. Goa was one of the major trade centers in India, thus it had always been attracting the influential dynasties, seafarers, merchants, traders, monks and missionaries since its earliest known history. Throughout its history Goa has undergone continual transformation, leaving an indelible impression on various aspects of its cultural and socio-economic development. History of Goa: The East-West symbiosis of Goa makes it different from other parts of India, more than the historical and social niche. The history of Goa is a sweet and sour story of colonial heritage, oppressive rulers, a glorious culture, and uneventful immediate past. As a land with the identity of its own, Goa was brought into focus when it was liberated of Portugal from its oppressive rule of around 450 hundred years in 1961. Goa was captured and annexed to the Portuguese in 1510 following the urges of trade and demand of spices and also cottons and indigo. But, Goa has a history that starts much before Portugal even thought of Goa being where it is. Goa was coveted and ruled by a great number of Indian kingdoms and dynasties from the 4th century onwards. The first kingdom to rule Goa and Konkan were Bhojas, who were the feudatories of Ashoka in 4th and 5th centuries AD. The city of Chandrapur (present Chandor) was founded by Prince Chandraditya, son of Chalukya King Pulakesin from 566 to 597 A.D. after this, Goa was ruled consecutively by Silahara Dynasty, Kadamba Danasty, and finally Hoysalas from 1022 to 1342 A.D. From the 14th century onwards, Goa became a great trading center on the west coast, especially in the vast trade of horses imported from the Middle East. This was the time for bigger empires to move in and Vijayanagar Empire conquered it in 1344. But there empire was not going to last too long and in 1347, Bahmani Sultans defeated Vijayanagara forces in 1347 and controlled Goa. Afterwards, it was a time of great prosperity and peace for Gpa, especially during the rules of Yusuf Adil Shah and Ismail Adil Shah. They created beautiful houses, fortified Goa, and encouraged local craftsmen. Their liberal and progressive rule was not going to last too long and situation changed in 1510 A.D. Goa for all purposes was not on the Portuguese Radar even after a long time of their presence in India. When the Portuguese nobleman Alfonso de Albuquerque and his cousin Francisco de Albuquerque were sent with a powerful fleet in 1503 on the orders of King Dom Manuel I, the purpose was to defend the cargoes of spices, mostly pepper, against Arab Muslim raiders. The center of spice trade was Calicut at that time and Portuguese had built forts in Cochin and Cannanore. It was in 1506-08 that an opportunistic pirate, Timoja, persuaded Albuquerque to attack Goa and acquire a better land base. This made Goa, Portugal's first real territorial acquisition in Asia. After a brief period of recapturing by the Muslims, Goa Albuquerque finally captured Goa in 1510. The inquisition of Goa in 1540 reversed the previous liberal policy of Albuquerque and imposed strict censorship of literature and new laws to forbade non-Christians from professions. Forced conversions took place continuously, censorship was established on literature, the temples were destroyed, and non-Christian priests, holy men, and teachers were evicted. This led to continuous fleeing of Hindus from Goa to other parts of India. It is not that the relationship with Portugal brought only destruction for the Goans. Portuguese also built great churches like the church of St. Cajetan and Bom Jesus basilica in Old Goa, which is a pilgrimage site for the Christians from around the world. But it is also true that pre-1961; Goa was a highly impoverished region very backward and primitive. It is after the liberation that Goa of today has emerged and it has surprised even the locals many of whom had left their homeland before its liberation. Portugal and India are today friends and Goa continues to be a fascinating blend of Latin and Oriental. Information sourced from: http://www.royalorienttrain.com/goa/goa-history.html
This entry was posted in Brazilian, london, London Designer Outlet, Shopping Centres, Square Meal - blogger reviews, steak, Wembley, Wembley Stadium and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Cabana – now open in Wembley!

  1. I like the helpful info you provide in your articles.
    I will bookmark your blog and check again here frequently.
    I’m quite certain I’ll learn many new stuff right here!

    Best of luck for the next!

    • goantolondon says:

      Hi,
      Thank you for getting in touch and for your lovely comment! Hope you continue to enjoy reading our blog. We always like to hear from and interact with our readers, so please feel free to spread the word about our blog, follow us on Twitter, and comment on current and future posts.
      Best wishes,
      Jason & Chiara

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